It’s Time to Stop Spraying Cats with Water Bottles!

It’s Time to Stop Spraying Cats with Water Bottles!

Why, oh why, is spraying cats with water still a thing?  In looking around online and talking with people, I find that - over and over again - people are drawn to using a squirt bottle to either discipline or punish cats for unwanted behavior.  Even shelters and those who should know better are still recommending the use of spray bottles or squirt guns.  With everything we now know about cats, learning, and behavior, we need to update this antiquated mode of trying to teach cats to stop one behavior and do something different!

Your Cat’s Emotional Connection

Your Cat’s Emotional Connection

As cat guardians, we spend a lot of time trying to ensure that our cats are happy and healthy.  This includes not only their physical welfare, but understanding our own role in our cat's emotional connection with us.  We can tell when our cats are happy and content, anxious, scared or fearful, or irritated.  Which is great - the more aware of how our kitties are feeling, the better we are able to meet their needs.

How to Build Your Cat’s Trust

How to Build Your Cat’s Trust

No matter what type of cat you have or what her personality is like, mutual trust in each other must be learned so that you can both enjoy a happy, healthy, relationship. Whether your cat is shy or fearful, bold or aggressive, there are things you should do to foster her confidence and faith in you. It's much easier to build your cat's trust from the get-go then to try to re-build it after you've broken it; however, cats are often forgiving creatures and they don't hold grudges (and they never act out of revenge or spite - cat's just don't think that way). With time, you can improve (or repair) the relationship with your cat to one of comfort, ease, and predictability. Here are a few things to keep in mind when trying to build your cat's trust.

Hiding Behavior in Cats

Hiding Behavior in Cats

There are several reasons cats hide, and and most cats include hiding as a normal, healthy activity in their repertoire of behaviors. First, cats are both predators and prey in the wild - they are instinctually driven to hide and conceal themselves when they are sneaking up on a prospective prey item, and avoiding being prey for other predators (i.e., any carnivore that is larger than they are). Second, hiding in the home can be a stress-reducing, relaxing thing to do. Third, cats may hide when they are ill or not feeling well. If your cat all of a sudden decides to start hiding for long periods of time or changes her hiding behavior, you will want to make a trip to the veterinarian to make sure everything is ok.